Welcome to Commonwealth Ocean New Zealand.  A pitch for business, government and local community to become involved. 

 

Tangaroa God Of The Sea

 

In Māori mythology, Tangaroa (also Takaroa) is one of the great gods, the god of the sea. Sometimes depicted as a great Whale

Source Wikipedia

 

 

Auckland to lead with 50 Whale sculptures that will be located throughout  the  city  in  aid  of helping  preserve   Waitematā  ancestral  waters  Kaitiakitanga  frame  work  and  the  Pacific Ocean  the  largest  and deepest  of  earth’s  oceanic  divisions.

 

As New Zealand is bordered by the South Pacific Ocean and the Tasman Sea this is a project of significant cultural and environmental importance to our country our people our heritage.

 

Culturally – Many traditions mention that whales accompanied or guided the canoes on their journeys to Aotearoa (New Zealand). Waitaha followed his sister Hāhuru to New Zealand from Hawaiki, guided by the whale Tūtarakauika. They eventually landed at Ō-tara-muturangi, near Matatā.

 

Environmentally – Whales are creatures of the open ocean; they feed, mate, give birth, suckle and raise their young at sea. So extreme  is  their adaptation  to  life underwater  that  they are  unable  to survive  on  land. They  can  also  be poisoned  by swallowing  litter,  such as plastics and micro  plastics

 

The significance of whale and this project will be one of its kind. It  will  enable  whales  to  come  ashore and  tell  their  story  through this sculpture trail throughout  Auckland of  how  they  are currently  facing  incredibly  damaging  effects  to  the  ocean  from  plastic waste,  run off , micro  plastics and marine  debris  entering  into their  food  chain. Ultimately if it’s entering into their food chain it’s in ours as well.

 

This Project will be significant in awareness and value for –

 

  • Waitematā ancestral waters. It is a harbour. Literally it is ‘waters glistening like obsidian’ and references the black obsidian matā rock where the ancestors placed the mauri for fish upon arriving from Hawaiiki.

 

  • Kaitiakitanga frame work if the land and sea is polluted then the health of the people will be affected as will the mana of the iwi.

 

  • Opportunity to lever the vast body of mātauranga Māori, derived from our cultural knowledge.

 

  • Whakapapa (genealogy) expresses our fundamental kinship with the atua and the natural world. Whakapapa explains the origins of animals, plants, features of the landscape and our own intrinsic relationship with them. Through these kinship obligations, kaitiakitanga is concerned with maintaining a natural and appropriate balance, particularly between the needs of people and the natural world. The perpetuation of our whakapapa (genealogy) and culture is paramount. Without a healthy environment  that  can sustain  us,  we  are  under  threat.

 

  • A circular economy is a regenerative system in which resource input and waste, emission, and energy leakage are minimised by slowing, closing, and narrowing energy and material loops; this can be achieved through long-lasting design, maintenance, repair, reuse, remanufacturing, refurbishing, and recycling. This is in contrast to a linear economy which is a ‘take, make, dispose’ model of production.

 

  • Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei wishes to see a shift towards waste reduction and better resource husbandry. In general terms, waste should be managed according to the “3-R’s” hierarchy: Reduce: avoid the generation of waste. • Reuse: reuse products either for their original or another purpose. • Recycle: process waste materials to replace virgin raw materials.

 

  • Māori cultural heritage is acknowledged to be a keystone of Auckland and New Zealand’s identity, yet there remains a general lack of knowledge and understanding within the general public about Māori cultural heritage, and its significance within the physical landscape.

 

  • Auckland City Council Auckland aspires to be zero-waste by 2040. Zero-waste is a long-term goal, but there’s a lot we can do right now. Focus on reducing litter, illegal dumping and marine waste.

 

  • The University of Auckland recognising a special relationship with Māori under the Treaty of Waitangi.

 

The story begins:

 

 

Auckland Sculpture Trail

 

Fifty  whale  sculptures  will  make  their way across  Auckland  with the  first permanent sculpture  to  be  unveiled  at  an official blessing  and  launch during celebration’s  in  Auckland. This sculpture to  hold  a  permeant  location  within  an Auckland Innovation Centre.

 

The  first sculpture  will  be this  beautifully crafted mesmerising Humpback Mother and Calf depicting a  joyful and  playful  life together.

The second and remaining sculptures will show the playful calf by itself. The calf has left its mother and ventured out depicting this through a multiple sculpture trail in and around Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei ‘heartland.

 

The reaming sculptures will form the story of the calf from a healthy young juvenile to being shown entangled in marine debris and plastic waste. Ultimately causing its tragic death due to being unable to feed and complications from digesting plastic waste in our oceans.

 

The sculptures to display identification markers, along with a brief story plaque, age of the calf, weight and distance travelled etc.

 

This project will engage with the people of Auckland along with providing a wonderful educational journey for our school children from all over the country who can follow the journey, while being able to engage in ocean pollution advocacy conservation and activities within a classroom environment afterwards.

 

Visitors to Auckland will be able to follow the sculpture trail, taking in some of Auckland’s land marks and Heritage sites. New Immigrants will appreciate the significance the whale has to our cultural heritage.

 

 

There  will  be  ten  whale sculptures destined  for  an  even  greater  good, with  all  proceeds  raised  from  their auction  going  to  benefiting  a  group of  charities  within  Auckland.

While many of the whale sculptures will remain as permanent artworks around Auckland for future generations to enjoy.

 

 

Outcomes:

 

  • Working in collaboration with Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei

 

  • Greater awareness for the central Auckland Isthmus is Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei ‘heartland’. The area extends from the Waitematā Harbour in the north, to the Manukau Harbour in the south, to Avondale in the west and embracing parts of Onehunga, Ellerslie, and Remuera to the east. It includes land around the Waitematā in the southern part of the North Shore and around the Upper Harbour area

 

  • Auckland to lead in becoming a better circular economy supporting Auckland City Council targets through the projects contribution to ocean conservation

 

  • Awareness regarding Micro Plastics

 

  • Raise funds for Auckland Charities through the auction of limited number of whales listed within the project scope

 

  • The University of Auckland to be consulted with the design phase

 

  • Auckland businesses boat builders to build sculptures and moulds

 

  • Creating employment and Jobs for Aucklanders

 

  • Engagement from Government and Auckland City Council

 

  • Supporting Māori Culture and Heritage

 

  • Engagement with local artist to paint sculptures

 

  • Advocacy for the Pacific garbage patch which is threatening our Island neighbours which hold significant heritage to early Māori ancestors

 

For real change, we must be able to reconnect with our heritage, stories and karakia, and share our knowledge and love of our whenua. Through collaboration with our partners, greater outcomes can be achieved for the environment, the economy, members of the iwi and the wider community.

Source Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei

 

Communicating a better future, we recognize we are advocates for the oceans as our sport is connected to this natural environment.

Source Americas Cup

 

Awareness through sport, especially aquatic sports which become platforms for advocacy towards the conservation and sustainable use of our oceans

Source Sport2Clean

 

About Micro Plastics and Ocean Plastics

 

Micro Plastics?

 

Microplastics are plastic particles that are smaller 1 mm in diameter. They are manufactured for use in products such as toothpaste and industrial processes, often as a scrubbing agent. Due to their size, they are often not recycled and end up in waterways and oceans. Microplastics can also result from the breakdown of larger plastic items.

Filter-feeding organisms often consume microplastics where they enter the food chain. According to some estimates there are around 5 trillion pieces of plastic floating in the world’s oceans.

 

 

 

Overview: Microplastics
Type Environmental Issue
Definition Small plastic particles that enter the environment, particularly waterways and oceans where they become part of the food chain.
Common Sources

Cosmetics

Clothing (synthetic fiber)

Industrial Processes

Breakdown of larger plastics

Impact

Plastic takes between 50 and 600 years to breakdown

The breakdown of plastic releases chemicals into waterways

Plastic may threaten species, including small species that are the basis of the ocean food chain.

Plastic enters the food chain at the lowest levels where it may impact the health of all ocean species and humans.

Potential Solutions

Capture and recycling at sewage treatment facilities

Reduction of waste from marine transport and commercial fishing.

Use of natural scrubbers such as crushed almonds in cosmetic products.

Use of plant based biodegradable plastics for industrial scrubbing.

Natural fibers in clothing

Collecting and recycling macro plastic debris in oceans

 

Related Concepts Environmental Issues

 

What is Ocean Plastic Clean-up?

Ocean plastic clean-up is a strategy to reduce the amount of plastic debris floating in the world’s oceans. The most common variant of the strategy is to manually clean up beaches that tend to attract large amounts of plastic due to ocean currents. Plastic is then sorted and recycled or reused. A typically beach clean-up recovers about 90% plastic items.

Plastic is estimated to take 50 to 600 years to decompose depending on the type and conditions. There are an estimated 5 trillion pieces of plastic floating or sunken in the world’s oceans. Such plastic enters the food chain and potentially threatens all ocean species and related ecological processes. Plastic also makes oceans less appealing and usable.

Large scale technologies have also been proposed for cleaning up visible plastic items from areas of concentration such as the great Pacific garbage patch. In theory technology could also be developed to clean up microplastics but this is a huge task as it is highly distributed amongst the estimated 332,519,000 cubic miles of water on the planet.

 

 

Overview: Ocean Plastic Clean-up
Type

Sustainability

Environmental remediation

Definition Capturing and recycling plastic debris from oceans.
Related Concepts

Extended Producer Responsibility

Environmental remediation

Circular Economy

 

Note: References *Wikipedia *Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Iwi Management Plan *Auckland University *Auckland City Council

WELCOME TO OUR COMMONWEALTH CONNECTED BY THE OCEAN. A CONTRIBUTOR RESOURCE TO HIGHLIGHT THE IMPACT OF MARINE DEBRIS IN OUR OCEANS. USE HASHTAG #COMMONWEALTHOCEAN TO JOIN US IN THIS CONVERSATION.

LITTER

LOCATION: PORT OF NUKUALOFA, TONGA

OCEAN: SOUTH PACIFIC

FOOD PACKAGING

LOCATION: PORT OF NUKUALOFA, TONGA

OCEAN: SOUTH PACIFIC

SINGLE USE PLASTIC

LOCATION: PUKEHINA BEACH, EAST COAST NEW ZEALAND

OCEAN: SOUTH PACIFIC

SINGLE USE PLASTIC

LOCATION: STRADBROKE ISLAND, EAST COAST AUSTRALIA

OCEAN: CORAL SEA

ALBATROSS

LOCATION: STRADBROKE ISLAND, EAST COAST AUSTRALIA

OCEAN: CORAL SEA

BODY BOARDING FIN

LOCATION: STRADBROKE ISLAND, EAST COAST AUSTRALIA

OCEAN: CORAL SEA

ROPE

LOCATION: STRADBROKE ISLAND, EAST COAST AUSTRALIA

OCEAN: CORAL SEA

PLASTIC BAG

LOCATION: COOK ISLANDS, RAROTONGA

OCEAN: PACIFIC OCEAN